With Six-Toed Cat – Ernest Hemingway – Changed The World

Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway

 

Nobel Prize

Ernest Hemingway won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. But his influence, his change-the-world-ability was showing long before that.

Hemingway was raised in Oak Park, Illinois. After high school he reported for a few months for The Kansas City Star, before leaving for the Italian front to enlist with the World War I ambulance drivers.

In 1918, he was seriously wounded and returned home. His wartime experiences formed the basis for his novel A Farewell to Arms.

In 1921, he married Hadley Richardson, the first of his four wives. The couple moved to Paris, where he worked as a foreign correspondent and fell under the influence of the modernist writers and artists of the 1920s “Lost Generation” expatriate community. The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway’s first novel, was published in 1926.st Hemingway won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. But his influence, his change-the-world-ability was showing long before that.

Hemingway was raised in Oak Park, Illinois. After high school he reported for a few months for The Kansas City Star, before leaving for the Italian front to enlist with the World War I ambulance drivers.

In 1918, he was seriously wounded and returned home. His wartime experiences formed the basis for his novel A Farewell to Arms.

In 1921, he married Hadley Richardson, the first of his four wives. The couple moved to Paris, where he worked as a foreign correspondent and fell under the influence of the modernist writers and artists of the 1920s “Lost Generation” expatriate community. The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway’s first novel, was published in 1926.

Legacy

Hemingway’s legacy to American literature, and therefore world literature, is his style: writers who came after him emulated it or avoided it. After his reputation was established with the publication of The Sun Also Rises, he became the spokesperson for the post-World War I generation, having established a style to follow.

His books were burned in Berlin in 1933, “as being a monument of modern decadence”. His parents disavowed his literature as “filth”. Reynolds asserts hiss legacy is that “he left stories and novels so starkly moving that some have become part of our cultural heritage”.

In a 2004 speech at the John F. Kennedy Library, Russell Banks declared that he, like many male writers of his generation, was influenced by Hemingway’s writing philosophy, style, and public image.

Timo Müller argues that Hemingway “has the highest recognition value of all writers worldwide”. On the other hand, in 2012, novelist John Irving rejected most of Hemingway’s work “except for a few short stories”, saying that the “write-what-you-know dictum has no place in imaginative literature”.

Hemingway in Ambulance Drivers Uniform

Hemingway in
Ambulance Drivers
Uniform

Irving also objected to the “offensive tough-guy posturing – all those stiff-upper-lip, don’t-say-much men” and contrasted Hemingway’s approach to that of Herman Melville, citing the latter’s advice: “Woe to him who seeks to please rather than appall.”

Restaurants and Bars and Furniture

His influence is evident with the many restaurants named “Hemingway”; and the number of bars called “Harry’s” (a nod to the bar in Across the River and Into the Trees). A line of Hemingway furniture, promoted by Hemingway’s son Jack (Bumby), has pieces such as the “Kilimanjaro” bedside table, and a “Catherine” slip-covered sofa. Montblanc offers a Hemingway fountain pen, and a line of Hemingway safari clothes has been created.

Foundations, Museums and Wrestling

In 1965 Mary Hemingway (another wife) established the Hemingway Foundation and in the 1970s she donated her husband’s papers to the John F. Kennedy Library. In 1980 a group of Hemingway scholars gathered to assess the donated papers, subsequently forming the Hemingway Society, “committed to supporting and fostering Hemingway scholarship”.

Ray Bradbury wrote The Kilimanjaro Device, in which Hemingway is transported to the top of Mount Kilimanjaro. The 1993 film Wrestling Ernest Hemingway, about the friendship of two retired men in a seaside town in Florida, is named after a story one of the characters tells about having wrestled Hemingway in the 1930s.

Works

The Torrents of Spring (1926)
The Sun Also Rises (1926)
A Farewell to Arms (1929)
To Have and Have Not (1937)
For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940)
Across the River and into the Trees (1950)
The Old Man and the Sea (1952)
Islands in the Stream (1970, posthumous)
The Garden of Eden (1986, posthumous)
True at First Light (1999, posthumous)

“The world breaks everyone and afterward many are strong in the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.”
A Farewell to Arms

Suicide

July 2, 1961, Hemingway “quite deliberately” shot himself with his favorite shotgun. He unlocked the basement storeroom where his guns were kept, went upstairs to the front entrance foyer of the Hemingway’s Ketchum home, and “pushed two shells into the twelve-gauge Boss shotgun …put the

Ernest and Pauline

Ernest and Pauline

end of the barrel into his mouth, pulled the trigger and blew out his brains”.

His wife Mary called the Sun Valley Hospital, and Dr. Scott Earle arrived at the house within “fifteen minutes”. Despite his finding that Hemingway “had died of a self-inflicted wound to the head”, the story told to the press was that the death had been “accidental”.

It seems to me that Ernest Hemingway was so despondent over his health and other life circumstances, that he completed suicide to relieve the “never-ending” pain. We will never know if this is an accurate interpretation of the situation.

His Writings and Personality Changed the World

You do not need to write the consummate novel. You do not need to get out of this world through suicide.

Hemingway and Col. Lanham

Hemingway and
Col. Lanham

(Please don’t carry through with it even if you have thoughts of it. Seek help.) But you do have an obligation, I believe, to make this a better place.

Ernest Hemingway did by his words and deeds. Perhaps more than in any other occupation you can see that a writer, by himself or herself, can change the world. Do something as you, one person, can change the world too.

Source: Wikipedia.org (Please donate to this fine resource.)

Comments and questions are welcomed. Please use the “Reply” section below. Or you can reach me at drbob4u@gmail.com

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Shot In The Head – Malala – Will Change The World

Fourteen Year Old Girl Stands Up To Taliban

Malala
Malala

Malala Yousafzai just wanted an education. Her father is a teacher so I would bet that his own education had a great influence on Malala. Becuas of her desire to learn, Malala defied the Taliban. The Taliban sent someone to kill here. She was shot in the head, but through a series of miraculous happenings, she survived and recovered.

She Just Wanted An Education

She was riding on a bus that takes children to and from school when a member of the Taliban stepped on board the bus. Malala was the only one on the vehicle who did not have her face covered. She was easily spotted by the gunman. He took aim and fired his gun.

Malala just wanted an education. There was no intent to start anything – except instruction for girls and women. What the gunman did not know was that Malala’s plight and story set off a world-wide reaction. He, the gunman, helped spark a renewed call for, at least, learning for girls and women.

He did not know that his action caused a new moment to begin rolling. (In a sense, this lone shooter, one person, also changed the world.)

Now Malala Has Written A Book

From her experiences and will, Malala has penned I Am Malala. It chronicles her story and her struggles and her dream of education for all the girls of the earth.

Perhaps we in the West take education for girls and women for granted. We believe it is a given; no one questions it any more. But this is not the case in the Middle East where in many countries women are still repressed and denied such basic rights as education.

Of course, the suppression of females’ rights and opportunities doesn’t begin or end with education. That is not within the scope of this blog, however. I am talking about one person who has already changed the world. So much so that she was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize – one of the youngest persons ever to be so nominated.

Meeting With U.S. First Family

Meeting With U.S.
First Family

In Other Words, She Has Already Changed The World

I doubt that she set out to do it, but done it she has. Her personal charm and humility have wooed audiences everywhere. Even Queen Elizabeth II asked Malala to be received. (Malala got the giggles over a joke by Prince Philip.)

Malala presented Her Majesty with a copy of the book I Am Malala. She presents us with the challenge of helping to see that all girls have the opportunity for education. Education is the great liberator, of course.

Through circumstances and personality, Malala has already changed he world. I can hardly wait to see what more good she will accomplish.

What Will You Accomplish?

You do not need to be shot in the head to do your part to change the world. You no longer have the excuse that one person can do nothing. I have shown you over and over again in the blog that one person can changed the world. When will you begin? What will you do? Who will you be?

Your comments and questions re always welcomed. Please use the “Reply” section below. Or you may contact me at drbob4u@gmail.com

Billie Jean King – With A Tennis Racket She Changed The World

Winner

Billie Jean King (née Moffitt; born November 22, 1943) is an American former World No. 1 professional tennis player. King won 39 Grand Slam titles, including 12 singles, 16 women’s doubles, and 11 mixed doubles titles.

Billy Jean King

Billy Jean King

King won the singles title at the inaugural WTA Tour Championships. King often represented the United States in the Federation Cup and the Wightman Cup. She was a member of the victorious United States team in seven Federation Cups and nine Wightman Cups. For three years, King was the United States’ captain in the Federation Cup.

King is an advocate for sexual equality. Then 29 years old, King won the Battle of the Sexes tennis match against the 55-year-old Bobby Riggs in 1973, and was the founder of the Women’s Tennis Association, World Team Tennis (with former husband Larry King), and the Women’s Sports Foundation.

King was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1987. The Fed Cup Award of Excellence was bestowed on King in 2010. In 1972, King was the joint winner, with John Wooden, of the Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year award and was one of the Time Persons of the Year in 1975.

King also received the Sunday Times Sportswoman of the year lifetime achievement award. King was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 1990, and in 2006, the USTA National Tennis Center in New York City was renamed the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.

Denunciation

In 1967, King criticized the United States Lawn Tennis Association (USLTA) in a series of press conferences, denouncing what she called the USLTA’s practice of “shamateurism”, where top players were paid under the table to guarantee their entry into tournaments.

King argued that this was corrupt and kept the game highly elitist. King quickly became a significant force in the opening of tennis to professionalism. King said this about the amateur game, “In America, tennis players are not people. If you are in tennis, you are a cross between a panhandler and a visiting in-law. You’re not respected, you’re tolerated. In England, you’re respected as an artist. In Europe, you’re a person of importance. Manuel Santana gets decorated by Franco. The Queen leads the applause. How many times have I been presented at the White House? You work all your life to win Wimbledon and Forest Hills and all the people say is, “That’s nice. Now what are you going to do with your life?” They don’t ask Mickey Mantle that. Stop 12 people on the street and ask them who Roy Emerson is and they’re stuck for an answer, but they know the third-string right guard for the Rams. I’d like to see tennis get out of its “sissy” image and see some guy yell, “Hit it, ya bum” and see it be a game you don’t have to have a lorgnette or a sash across your tuxedo to get in to watch.”


$100,000

Billy Jean King and Bobby Rigg from BodyParticles.com

Billy Jean King and
Bobby Rigg
from BodyParticles.com

When the open era began, King campaigned for equal prize money in the men’s and women’s games. As the financial backing of the women’s game improved due to the efforts of World Tennis magazine founder, publisher and editor Gladys Heldman, King became the first woman athlete to earn over US$100,000 in prize money in 1971; however, inequalities continued.

King won the US Open in 1972 but received US$15,000 less than the men’s champion Ilie Nastase. She stated that she would not play the next year if the prize money were not equal. In 1973, the US Open became the first major tournament to offer equal prize money for men and women.

On Raising Children

Chris Evert, winner of 18 Grand Slam singles titles, has said, “She’s the wisest human being that I’ve ever met and has vision people can only dream about. Billie Jean King is my mentor and has given me advice about my tennis and my boyfriends. On dealing with my parents and even how to raise children. And she doesn’t have any.”


Peanuts

Charles M. Schulz, creator of the Peanuts comic strip, was an admirer and close friend. Schulz referred to King several times in Peanuts over the years. In one strip, Peppermint Patty tells Marcie, “Has anyone ever told you that when you’re mad, you look just like Billie Jean King?” This strip was reprinted in The Complete Peanuts 1973–74, for which King wrote the introduction.


Outed

By 1968, King realized that she was interested in women, and in 1971, began an intimate relationship with her secretary, Marilyn Barnett. King acknowledged the relationship when it became public in a May 1981 ‘palimony’ lawsuit filed by Barnett, making King the first prominent professional female athlete to come out as a lesbian. King said that she had wanted to retire from competitive tennis in 1981 but could not afford to because of the lawsuit.

She said, “Within 24 hours [of the lawsuit being filed], I lost all my endorsements; I lost everything. I lost $2 million at least, because I had longtime contracts. I had to play just to pay for the lawyers. In three months I went through $500,000. I was in shock. I didn’t make $2 million in my lifetime, so it’s all relative to what you make.”


Medal of Freedom

King played a judge on Law & Order on April 27, 2007, and appeared on Ugly Betty in May 2009.

On August 12, 2009, she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama for her work advocating for the rights of women and the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community. “This is a chance for me – and for the United States of America – to say thank you to some of the finest citizens of this country and of all countries”, President Obama said.


What a Full Life and It Is Not Over Yet


How much time do you have left in your life? No matter how much or how little time you think you have, no matter what personal challenges you face, you can make a difference. Yes, you, one single person. Get to it.

Additional Source: Wikipedia.org (Please donate to this fine resource.)